Share This

Share Button

Viewing a painting can be a very thoughtful and still activity.  Although many evocative paintings can stir viewer’s senses, FADA is getting multidisciplinary with this post’s exploration of lingering musical undertones in art.  Each artwork from FADA's inventory below will be accompanied by song: an imaginative exercise pairing each narrative with a sound in which we're imagining could very well be playing in the artist’s mind.  Perhaps we already associate certain artistic movements with musical genres: and they often did supplement each other.  Works from the Romantic period pair well with the stirring compositions of Beethoven.  The two art forms curated together work well, creating a new narrative allowing viewers to understand artworks:

each brushstroke a new melody.

 

12-15-1

Charles Emile Jacque’s  pastoral Bergere et moutons à l’orée de la fôret (Shepardess and Sheep at the Edge of the Forest) from Schiller & Bodo European Paintings is accompanied with Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt Suite #1, Op. 46 - 1. Morning Mood.  Both painting and composition move at a leisurely pace within their 19th century timeframe. www.youtube.com/watchv=kzTQ9fjforY

12-15-2

Rusty Scruby’s Horizon from PYO Gallery, with its cool Californian waves may just scream the Beach Boy’s Good Vibrations.

Get swept away by the waves and transported back to the 1960’s with each groovy cutout. www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eab_beh07HU

12-15-3

James Reynolds’ Cowboys and Steer from Nedra Matteucci Galleries -although probably a cliché-seems right to be paired with a Johnny Cash tune.  Cash’s husky voice reverberates throughout the cowboy landscape. www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mynzbmrtp9I

 

12-15-4

Joan Miro’s Galerie Maeght: Barcelona Exhibition 1974 from Galerie Michael, demonstrates why jazz music just fits in non-figurative works composed of popping colors.  One can envision the artist patronizing Parisian clubs listening to the divine Joséphine Baker. www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xenpU5g-ZY   OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Susan Grossman’s bustling and recognizable cityscape, 7th Avenue, from Jerald Melberg Gallery takes on an ethereal quality with its charcoal medium: quite like Suzanne Vega’s Tom’s Diner. www.youtube.com/watch?v=-26hsZqwveA    

/* initialize colorbox */